Queens Library

Queens Library is an independent, not-for-profit corporation and is not affiliated with any other library. With 62 locations, Queens Library serves a population of 2.3 million in one of the most ethnically diverse counties in the U.S. and has among the highest circulations of any public library system in the world. For more information about programs, services, locations, events and news, visit the Queens Library website at www.queenslibrary.org or phone 718-990-0700. Queens Library. Enrich Your Life.®
Recent Tweets @QueensLibrary
Posts I Like
Who I Follow
Posts tagged "queens"

Happy Brooklyn-Queens Day! The holiday, which began in 1829 to celebrate the founding of Sunday Schools in Brooklyn, used to be called Anniversary Day. This photo of children and adults marching in an Anniversary Day parade in Sunset Park was taken circa 1916.

If you missed yesterday’s #HipHopElements #31DaysofNonStopHipHop opening event, check out this awesome video from Kids Helping Kids: a hip hop experience

The Unisphere from the 1964 New York World’s Fair in Flushing Meadows-Corona Park. Today is the 50th Anniversary of the day it opened!

This is the #snowy scene at 89 ave & Merrick blvd. in #Jamaica #Queens #NYC. All locations are closing today at 5pm. Stay safe & warm!

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was born on January 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia. Celebrate his contributions to civil rights and equality this Saturday at our annual tribute

(Photo by Victor Hugo King)

He was handsome. He was young. He was a war hero. He was the son of a massively powerful American family. He was, as many powerful men of his time, a philanderer. He was a symbol — first of a new generation’s idealism, and then its loss of innocence. On November 22, 1963 a national tragedy was realized when the 35th President of the United States of America was shot and killed in an open-air motorcade in downtown Dallas.

This action, whether perpetrated by a lone gunman or through one of the many conspiracies postulated in the 50 years since the event, changed the face of the world. Whatever one’s political beliefs, one cannot remain unchanged by the assassination of a sitting president, and any American who was alive and old enough to remember can tell you where they were when they heard the news.

On November 22, 2013 we acknowledge this event’s 50th anniversary and reexamine, as a nation, the life and death of John Fitzgerald Kennedy: son, husband, father and leader of the free world from his inauguration on January 20, 1961 to the day of his murder on November 22, 1963.

We have prepared a guide of materials and resources about the event below. Take a moment and tell us what this event meant to you or to your family members. With half a century of scrutiny and scholarship between us and the assassination, what do you think Kennedy’s death has to teach us? Which version of JFK is the most useful to us today?

Media coverage:

NBC will air “Where Were You?” a two-hour documentary with a book companion.

 

The Military Channel is airing “What If…? Armageddon 1962” on Nov. 24, which explores the thwarted plot to assassinate Kennedy by a political fanatic named Richard Pavlick in Palm Beach, Fla., in 1960.

 

Websites to explore:

http://www.dallasnews.com/news/jfk50/

http://50thhonoringjohnfkennedy.com/

http://www.jfk50.org/

http://www.jfklibrary.org/JFK/JFK-in-History/November-22-1963-Death-of-the-President.aspx

http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/k/john_fitzgerald_kennedy/index.html

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2013/05/23/john-kennedy-assassination-obama-50th-anniversary/2352697/

http://www.thefutoncritic.com/news/2013/09/30/kevin-spacey-narrates-the-kennedy-died-premiering-sunday-november-17-on-smithsonian-channel-104412/20130930smithsonian01/

http://www.mediabistro.com/tvnewser/tom-brokaw-to-host-nbc-news-special-remembering-50th-anniversary-of-jfks-death_b200265

http://www.archives.gov/research/jfk/

 

Books:

Where Were You? compiled and edited by veteran journalist Gus Russo and film director Harry Moses, with a foreword by newsman Tom Brokaw

Camelot’s Court: Inside the Kennedy White House by presidential historian Robert Dallek

Dallas 1963 by Bill Minutaglio and Steven L. Davis

Five days in November by Clint Hill and Lisa McCubbin

 

DVDs:

The Day Kennedy Died narrated by Kevin Spacey

The Murder of JFK: A Revisionist History

 JFK: A Personal Story (Biography Channel)

 JFK: The Presidential Years

 American Assassin

 

Who remembers Loft Candy on this #ThrowbackThursday?
Loft Candy was founded in the 1860s in Manhattan, but moved to the large factory building at 40th Avenue and Vernon Boulevard in 1919. At that time, it was regarded as the largest candy facility in the world This photo from www.queensmemory.org shows women workers inside the factory in 1941.
Loft went out of business in 1990, but its confections, like the Parlay Bar and Butter Nut Crunch, burn brightly in the nostalgia of Baby Boomers who grew up along the Eastern Seaboard. The candy is long gone, but you can see one relic of Loft’s influence over the refreshment world: The Pepsi-Cola sign. A bankrupt Pepsi was purchased by Loft in the early 1930s and gradually became one of the largest corporations in the world.

Who remembers Loft Candy on this #ThrowbackThursday?

Loft Candy was founded in the 1860s in Manhattan, but moved to the large factory building at 40th Avenue and Vernon Boulevard in 1919. At that time, it was regarded as the largest candy facility in the world This photo from www.queensmemory.org shows women workers inside the factory in 1941.

Loft went out of business in 1990, but its confections, like the Parlay Bar and Butter Nut Crunch, burn brightly in the nostalgia of Baby Boomers who grew up along the Eastern Seaboard. The candy is long gone, but you can see one relic of Loft’s influence over the refreshment world: The Pepsi-Cola sign. A bankrupt Pepsi was purchased by Loft in the early 1930s and gradually became one of the largest corporations in the world.

Celebrating the NEW Queens Library at Mitchell-Linden with a parade and lion dancers, September 30, 2013.

Queens Library President & CEO Thomas Galante led the parade along with Deputy Borough President Barry Grodenchik, Council Member Peter Koo, State Senator Toby Ann Stavisky, Assembly Member Ron Kim, and Queens Library Board Chairwoman Jackie Arrington.


The celebration concluded with the feeding of a book to the lion—in place of the traditional lettuce—as a boon to the lifelong learning this space will foster in northern Flushing.


Thanks to Borough President Helen Marshall and Council Member Peter Koo for making this project possible. All photos courtesy of Dominick Totino Photography.

On #ThowbackThursday — Three kinds of transportation, only one of which is any good now, sit idle at the flooded Flushing Airport after the massive hurricane of 1938. Winds from this storm hit a staggering 121 mph! Want to know more? Read the QL blog here: http://ow.ly/pfP2E

This #ThrowbackThursday, we look at old hurricanes and Queens via Queens Memory Project (http://ow.ly/paMGT ). The hurricane season of 1955 was particularly hard on New York. Two hurricanes hit within days of each other in August of that year. Check out how badly flooded downtown Jamaica looks in this shot on Jamaica Avenue near Sutphin Boulevard! Anyone remember these storms?

This #ThrowbackThursday, we look at old hurricanes and Queens via Queens Memory Project (http://ow.ly/paMGT ). The hurricane season of 1955 was particularly hard on New York. Two hurricanes hit within days of each other in August of that year. Check out how badly flooded downtown Jamaica looks in this shot on Jamaica Avenue near Sutphin Boulevard! Anyone remember these storms?